I'm a trapeze artist

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A Quaker preacher, Phd in Intercultural Studies, & adjunct prof. I enjoy a good remix, liberation theology, bourbon & a wool vest. Find me at @cwdaniels.

September 16, 2014 at 11:41am
0 notes

Dan Mangan - Road Regrets

We’ll drive until the gas is gone And then walk until our feet are torn Crawl until we feed the soil Film the whole thing

It’s all business in the left hand lane Drive there and then drive back again Escape can be the only way To escape

So I’ve gotten used to coffee sweats Still getting used to road regrets Hell, I took you up on all your threats To leave

It’s a shame, it’s a crying shame Them’s the breaks And ain’t it always the way It takes you back to from where it is you came

Robby likes his country tunes It’s never been the lens that I see through But I guess driving for a week or two Puts words in your mouth

So find Dodge and then get out of it It’s about as country as I can So you ain’t living until you’re living it Not dead ‘til you die

But watch out for the paraphrase ‘Cause it will crown you and it will take your legs See the cost is more than you get paid But do it anyway

It’s a shame, it’s a crying shame Them’s the breaks And ain’t it always the way It takes you back to from where it is you came It’s a shame, it’s a crying shame Them’s the breaks And ain’t always the way It takes you back to from where it is you came

(Source: youtube.com)

September 10, 2014 at 8:04pm
15 notes

How to compose a successful critical commentary:

  1. You should attempt to re-express your target’s position so clearly, vividly, and fairly that your target says, “Thanks, I wish I’d thought of putting it that way.

  2. You should list any points of agreement (especially if they are not matters of general or widespread agreement).

  3. You should mention anything you have learned from your target.

  4. Only then are you permitted to say so much as a word of rebuttal or criticism.

— How to Criticize with Kindness: Philosopher Daniel Dennett on the Four Steps to Arguing Intelligently | Brain Pickings

September 9, 2014 at 7:53am
2 notes
I was interviewed for the podcast “sermon smith” about what it means for me to be a Quaker preacher and how I use #sketchnotes in my preparation. http://sermonsmith.com/wess-daniels/

I was interviewed for the podcast “sermon smith” about what it means for me to be a Quaker preacher and how I use #sketchnotes in my preparation. http://sermonsmith.com/wess-daniels/

September 5, 2014 at 9:06am
2 notes

The option of the poor forces us to be honest

“The option for the poor also forces us to be honest about reality by forcing us to recognize the intrinsically relational, or communal character of human persons and human action. In other words, the choice before all of us, wealthy and poor alike, is not whether to be with the poor, but whether to do so self-consciously and intentionally; like it or not, we are already with the poor, and the poor are already with us. Every day, all of us – whether poor or wealthy, underprivileged or privileged – experience the consequences of poverty and oppression. For the privileged, those consequences take many forms: a paralyzing fear of other persons, constant anxiety about protecting one’s possessions against the “threat” represented by the poor… The need to enslave others inevitably produces a generalized fear and anxiety which, in the end, enslave us all.” (p 178)

-Goizueta, Roberto S. Caminemos Con Jesus: Toward a Hispanic/Latino Theology of Accompaniment

September 4, 2014 at 9:20am
9 notes

if we become more concerned with policing the boundaries of the Christian tradition than exemplifying the Christian tradition, we can easily lose our post-partisan character. Any tradition will have boundaries, and any tradition can (and should) argue about those boundaries, yet as Christians we do so as a peaceable community.

Therefore, we might begin by seeing tradition not as a territory to be defended, but rather as a place to encounter the living God as known in Christ. Tradition should give us grounding—and the assurance that comes with such grounding—but it should also unsettle us. As we encounter Jesus through tradition and scripture, they should challenge our comfortable human categories of belonging, they should draw us outside of ourselves into the often uncomfortable presence of the Spirit.

In conceiving such a peaceable understanding of the Christian tradition, Rowan Williams offers a place to start:

The Christian Gospel claims its location…not by setting up a distinctive territory that has to be defended by any means possible against others, but by announcing that there is space for humanity to be itself and to receive what it needs to grow and be healed, a place where God’s initiative in Jesus’ life and death and resurrection decisively made room for the human creation so that there is no more anxiety, no more negotiating, no more struggling to find the currency for mediation between heaven and earth” (pp. 181 of Praying for England, Wells and Coakley editors).

— Rev. Ross Kane

August 25, 2014 at 6:41pm
9 notes
Reblogged from holabrody

Alex Haley: Can you recall any mistakes you’ve made in leading the movement?

Martin Luther King, Jr.: Well, the most pervasive mistake I have made was in believing that because our cause was just, we could be sure that the white ministers of the South, once their Christian consciences were challenged, would rise to our aid. I felt that white ministers would take our cause to the white power structure. I ended up, of course, chastened and disillusioned. As our movement unfolded, and direct appeals were made to white ministers, most folded their hands—and some even took stands against us.

— http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/01/19/alex-haley-s-1965-playboy-interview-with-rev-martin-luther-king-jr.html (via holabrody)

6:40pm
3,407 notes
Reblogged from christel-thoughts

theologyjones:

christel-thoughts:

  • Eric Garner (July 17)
  • John Crawford (Aug 5)
  • Michael Brown (Aug 9)
  • Armand Bennett (Aug 10)
  • Ezell Ford (Aug 11)
  • Dante Parker (Aug 12)

We have names.

(via holabrody)

6:40pm
14 notes
Reblogged from holabrody

#DCtoFerguson: Remembering  →

holabrody:

image

For four hours, Michael’s lifeless body lay exposed to Missouri’s summer sun. For four hours, a previously living, unarmed man was abandoned by a system that claims it exists to protect and serve. Today, I saw the place of his death. I walked on the cement became another altar of white supremacy, using another black body as a sacrifice. And I was angry. And I was sad. And I was hopeless. I am angry, sad, and hopeless.

August 12, 2014 at 3:20pm
6 notes

If I define my neighbor as the one I must go out to look for, on the highways and byways, in the factories and slums, on the farms and in the mines - then my world changes. This is what is happening with the ‘option for the poor,’ for in the gospel it is the poor person who is the neighbor par excellence.

The poor person does not exist as an inescapable fact of destiny. His or her existence is not politically neutral, and it is not ethically innocent. The poor are a by-product of the system in which we live and for which we are responsible. They are marginalized by our social and cultural world. They are the oppressed, exploited proletariat, robbed of the fruit of their labor and despoiled of their humanity. Hence the poverty of the poor is not a call to generous relief action, but a demand that we go and build a different social order.

— Gustavo Gutierrez

August 11, 2014 at 4:03pm
9 notes
Reblogged from afsc-org

12:05pm
30 notes

You took my son away from me. Do you know how hard it was for me to get him to stay in school and graduate? You know how many black men graduate? Not many. Because you bring them down to this type of level, where they feel like they don’t got nothing to live for anyway. ‘They’re going to try to take me out anyway.’

— Lesley McSpadden (Mike Brown’s Mom) Police Say Mike Brown Was Killed After Struggle for Gun in St. Louis Suburb - NYTimes.com

July 18, 2014 at 6:54am
5 notes

Solidarity with the poor is not the same as empathy. Many people feel sorry for the poor or identity with their suffering yet do nothing to alleviate it. All too often people of privilege engage in forms of spiritual materialism where they seek recognition of their goodness by helping the poor. And they proceed in the efforts without changing their contempt and hatred of the poverty. Genuine solidarity with the poor is rooted in the recognition that interdependency sustains the life of the planet. That includes the recognition that the fate of the poor both locally and globally will to a grave extent determine the quality of life for those who are lucky enough to have a class privilege. Repudiating exploitation by word and deed is a gesture of solidarity with the poor. -bell hooks (130)

— bell hooks

July 16, 2014 at 4:34pm
22 notes
Reblogged from profp
profp:

Walked here this morning between the rain showers. As we hiked through fields of tall wet grass, the trail lined with wild raspberry canes just setting fruit, the calls of summer birds filling the air, I was reminded of this lovely poem by Mary Oliver:

Walking to Oak-Head Pond, and
Thinking of the Ponds I Will Visit in the
Next Days and Weeks

-/-/-/-

What is so utterly invisible
as tomorrow?
Not love,
not the wind,

not the inside of stone.
Not anything.
And yet, how often I’m fooled-
I’m wading along

in the sunlight-
and I’m sure I can see the fields and the ponds shining
days ahead-
I can see the light spilling

like a shower of meteors
into next week’s trees,
and I plan to be there soon-
and, so far, I am

just that lucky,
my legs splashing
over the edge of darkness,
my heart on fire.

I don’t know where
such certainty comes from-
the brave flesh
or the theater of the mind-

but if I had to guess
I would say that only 
what the soul is supposed to be
could send us forth

with such cheer
as even the leaf must wear
as it unfurls
its fragrant body, and shines

against the hard possibility of stoppage-
which, day after day,
before such brisk, corpuscular belief,
shudders, and gives way.

(Erzgebirge; iphone 5)

profp:

Walked here this morning between the rain showers. As we hiked through fields of tall wet grass, the trail lined with wild raspberry canes just setting fruit, the calls of summer birds filling the air, I was reminded of this lovely poem by Mary Oliver:

Walking to Oak-Head Pond, and
Thinking of the Ponds I Will Visit in the
Next Days and Weeks

-/-/-/-

What is so utterly invisible
as tomorrow?
Not love,
not the wind,

not the inside of stone.
Not anything.
And yet, how often I’m fooled-
I’m wading along

in the sunlight-
and I’m sure I can see the fields and the ponds shining
days ahead-
I can see the light spilling

like a shower of meteors
into next week’s trees,
and I plan to be there soon-
and, so far, I am

just that lucky,
my legs splashing
over the edge of darkness,
my heart on fire.

I don’t know where
such certainty comes from-
the brave flesh
or the theater of the mind-

but if I had to guess
I would say that only
what the soul is supposed to be
could send us forth

with such cheer
as even the leaf must wear
as it unfurls
its fragrant body, and shines

against the hard possibility of stoppage-
which, day after day,
before such brisk, corpuscular belief,
shudders, and gives way.

(Erzgebirge; iphone 5)

June 30, 2014 at 6:44am
0 notes

Fighting For Hip-Hop In The Whitest City In America →

June 20, 2014 at 11:40am
0 notes
(via Counting Chrysalis - Radiolab)

(via Counting Chrysalis - Radiolab)